Lead paint awareness for parents

by Mr. Baby Proofer on December 3, 2013

Lead

Today at least 4 million households have children living in them that are being exposed to high levels of lead. There are approximately half a million U.S. children ages 1-5 with blood lead levels above 5 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL), the reference level at which CDC recommends public health actions be initiated.
Lead exposure can affect nearly every system in the body. Because lead exposure often occurs with no obvious symptoms, it frequently goes unrecognized. CDC’s Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program is committed to the Healthy People 2020 goals of eliminating blood lead levels ≥ 10 µg/dL and differences in average risk based on race and social class as public health concerns. The program is part of the National Center for Environmental Health’sDivision of Emergency and Environmental Health Services.

Prevention Tips

Lead poisoning is entirely preventable. The key is stopping children from coming into contact with lead and treating children who have been poisoned by lead.

The goal is to prevent lead exposure to children before they are harmed. There are many ways parents can reduce a child’s exposure to lead. The most important is stopping children from coming into contact with lead. Lead hazards in a child’s environment must be identified and controlled or removed safely.

How are children exposed to lead?

Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are the most hazardous sources of lead for U.S. children. Lead-based paints were banned for use in housing in 1978. All houses built before 1978 are likely to contain some lead-based paint. However, it is the deterioration of this paint that causes a problem. Approximately 24 million housing units have deteriorated leaded paint and elevated levels of lead-contaminated house dust. More than 4 million of these dwellings are homes to one or more young children.

Who is at risk?

Children under the age of 6 years old are at risk because they are growing so rapidly and because they tend to put their hands or other objects, which may be contaminated with lead dust, into their mouths.

Children living at or below the poverty line who live in older housing are at greatest risk. Additionally, children of some racial and ethnic groups and those living in older housing are disproportionately affected by lead.

What can be done to prevent exposure to lead?

It is important to determine the construction year of the house or the dwelling where your child spends a large amount of time (e.g., grandparents or daycare). In housing built before 1978, assume that the paint has lead unless tests show otherwise.

Talk to your state or local health department about testing paint and dust from your home for lead.
Make sure your child does not have access to peeling paint or chewable surfaces painted with lead-based paint.
Children and pregnant women should not be present in housing built before 1978 that is undergoing renovation. They should not participate in activities that disturb old paint or in cleaning up paint debris after work is completed.
Create barriers between living/play areas and lead sources. Until environmental clean-up is completed, you should clean and isolate all sources of lead. Close and lock doors to keep children away from chipping or peeling paint on walls. You can also apply temporary barriers such as contact paper or duct tape, to cover holes in walls or to block children’s access to other sources of lead.
Regularly wash children’s hands and toys. Hands and toys can become contaminated from household dust or exterior soil. Both are known lead sources.
Regularly wet-mop floors and wet-wipe window components. Because household dust is a major source of lead, you should wet-mop floors and wet-wipe horizontal surfaces every 2-3 weeks. Windowsills and wells can contain high levels of leaded dust. They should be kept clean. If feasible, windows should be shut to prevent abrasion of painted surfaces or opened from the top sash. Take off shoes when entering the house to prevent bringing lead-contaminated soil in from outside.
Prevent children from playing in bare soil; if possible, provide them with sandboxes. Plant grass on areas of bare soil or cover the soil with grass seed, mulch, or wood chips, if possible. Until the bare soil is covered, move play areas away from bare soil and away from the sides of the house. If you have a sandbox, cover the box when not in use to prevent cats from using it as a litter box. That will help protect children from exposure to animal waste.

To further reduce a child’s exposure from non-residential paint sources:

avoid using traditional folk medicine and cosmetics that may contain lead;
avoid eating candies imported from Mexico;
avoid using containers, cookware, or tableware to store or cook foods or liquids that are not shown to be lead free;
remove recalled toys and toy jewelry immediately from children. Check Lead Recalls lists.
use only cold water from the tap for drinking, cooking, and making baby formula (Hot water is more likely to contain higher levels of lead. Most of the lead in household water usually comes from the plumbing in your house, not from the local water supply.);
shower and change clothes after finishing a task that involves working with lead-based products such as stained glass, making bullets, or using a firing range.’
Increasing your awareness and taking steps to prevent lead poisoning is key to ensure your children will grow in a healthy lead free environment.
-Mr. Baby Proofer

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Summer Recalls Product

by Mr. Baby Proofer on October 2, 2012

Summer Infant Recalls to Repair Baby Bathers Due to Fall and Head Injury Hazard
Consumers should order free repair kit

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and Health Canada, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.

Name of Product: Mother’s Touch/Deluxe Baby Bathers

Units: About 2 million in the United States and an additional 65,000 in Canada

Manufacturer: Summer Infant Inc., of Woonsocket, R.I.

Hazard: When the bather is lifted and/or carried with an infant in it, its folding wire frame can suddenly disengage from the side hinge, dropping the baby out of the bather, posing a fall hazard and a risk of serious head injury to infants.

Incidents/Injuries: CPSC and Summer Infant have received seven reports of incidents in the U.S., including five reports of infants suffering head injuries from falls from the bathers. Four children between two weeks and two months old received skull fractures, including one that required intensive care for bleeding on the brain. The fifth child received a bump to the head requiring emergency room treatment.

Description: This recall involves Summer Infant baby bathers with a small, nearly square blue or pink plastic base measuring about 13 ½ inches long by 12 ½ inches wide and with the following model numbers listed below. Model numbers are located either on the side of the baby bather near the warning label or on the front near the wash instructions. Some units have multiple model numbers. Model numbers with an additional letter at the end of the model number are also included in this recall.

Recalled Summer Infant Baby Bathers
Model Numbers
08020, 08050, 08054, 08070, 08401, 08409, 08404, 08405, 08650, 08655, 08659, 08754, 08940, 08944
18004, 18040, 18049, 18050, 18120, 18125, 18129, 18254, 18360, 18375, 18379, 18390, 18394, 18440, 18445, 18449, 18470, 18475, 18479
38510, 38515, 38750, 38755
The bathers have adjustable side hinges with five rivets each and a white wire frame with a mesh fabric sling seat and two or three positions for the seats. Some also have a head support cushion. The fabric seat comes in various colors including white, blue, green, yellow and orange with fish, turtles, butterflies, frogs, flowers and duck patterns. Bathers manufactured since July 2007 include the warning “Never lift or carry the bather with infant in it.”

Sold at: Mass merchandise stores nationwide and on the Web from September 2004 through November 2011 for between $15 and $30.

Manufactured in: China

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the bathers and contact Summer Infant for a free repair kit that includes a locking strap and instructions. Note: Even with the new locking strap installed, the baby bather product should never be used to lift and carry an infant.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Summer Infant at (800) 426-8627 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit the firm’s website at www.summerinfant.com/batherrepairkit. Do not return to stores as the retailers will not have the repair kit

Note: Health Canada’s press release is available at http://cpsr-rspc.hc-sc.gc.ca/PR-RP/recall-retrait-eng.jsp?re_id=1675

Side hinges have five rivets

Bathers manufactured since July 2007 include the warning “Never lift or carry the bather with infant in it.”

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about your experience with the product on SaferProducts.gov

CPSC is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of the thousands of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $900 billion annually. CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals – contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.

Under federal law, it is illegal to attempt to sell or resell this or any other recalled product.

To report a dangerous product or a product-related injury, go online to: SaferProducts.gov, call CPSC’s Hotline at (800) 638-2772 or teletypewriter at (301) 595-7054 for the hearing and speech impaired. Consumers can obtain this news release and product safety information at www.cpsc.gov. To join a free e-mail subs

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Car Seat Harness Strap Adjustment

April 19, 2012

Have you checked or adjusted your child’s car seat harness straps lately? I’ve noticed that often times parents will adjust their child’s harness straps either too early or too late. Proper adjustment of these straps is a vital step to your child restraints safety function. Remember: If your child is still REAR FACING (2 and [...]

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Beverly Hills Nannies

March 27, 2012

Today, Mr. Baby Proofer will have a camera crew on one of our installations shooting footage for a  new show that will air in July on ABC Family called Beverly Hills Nannies! This is a reality show that will follow five family’s and their nannies to show the day in the life’s of nannies and [...]

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Child Safety Gate Product Review

November 19, 2011

When baby proofing your home, there are many important steps and details to consider before you start your job. One key factor is product selection. Each product you choose must be the right one to fit your home’s application.  With stairway gates, there are so many variables that can make installation quite a task. Even [...]

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Baby Proofing for Grandparents

September 6, 2011

Grandparents need baby proofing too! Many of my clients have struggled with getting the grandparents on board with baby proofing. Twenty years ago it was close to impossible, and I’ve been witness to many of these situations. Often times the end result would be a stand off with the parents not taking the baby over [...]

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Happy Mothers Day

May 8, 2011

Mr. Baby Proofer would like to wish a very Happy Mothers Day to the most special people in the world-MOM’s! For all you do, everyday should be mothers day! Enjoy your day! -Mr. Baby Proofer

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New Guidelines released for Child Passenger Safety

March 21, 2011

New Age-Focused Guidelines Help Parents Make More Informed Choices The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has revised its child restraint guidelines to be categorized by age rather than by type of child seat in order to keep pace with the latest scientific and medical research and the development of new child restraint technologies. Under the [...]

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Tips on Crib to Toddler Bed transition

March 8, 2011

It’s time! You have made it through many stages, the night-time feedings, the early morning feedings, taking turns getting up, taking on the extra bed so Dad can get up and safely drive to work without falling asleep. Now it’s time to transition to the “big kid bed”!  This stage can be a scary as [...]

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Child related product recalls for January

February 26, 2011

Be sure to subscribe to our blog for all the latest news, and information to keep your little ones safe! 1/1/2011 – JB Inc. Recalls Lili Gaufrette Children’s Hooded Cardigans with Drawstrings Due to Strangulation Hazard 1/11/2011 – Infant and Toddler Footed Pajamas Recalled by Pajamagram Due to Choking Hazard 1/11/2011 – Children’s Hooded Sweatshirts [...]

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